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National Astoronomical Observatory of Japan

National Institute of Natural Sciences

Hinode Science Center
National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ)


Hinode, IRIS, and ATERUI Cooperate on 70 year old Solar Mystery
Magnetically driven resonance helps heat the Sun's atmosphere!

Solar physicists have captured the first direct observational signatures of resonant absorption, thought to play an important role in solving the "coronal heating problem" which has defied explanation for over 70 years.

An international research team from Japan, the U.S.A., and Europe led by Drs. Joten Okamoto and Patrick Antolin combined high resolution observations from JAXA's Hinode mission and NASA's IRIS (Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph) mission, together with state-of-the-art numerical simulations and modeling from NAOJ's ATERUI supercomputer. In the combined data, they were able to detect and identify the observational signatures of resonant absorption.

See this page.

(2015/8/24)


"Let's observe the Sun with Hinode 2015" will be carried out from Aug.24 to Aug.29, 2015.

"Let's observe the Sun with Hinode" is a joint observation campaign carried out by Hinode and junior high/high school students every summer and winter vacation since 2010. This year, it is carried out from Aug. 24 (Mon) to Aug. 29 (Sat), titled as "Let's observe the Sun with Hinode 2015."
See this page.

(2015/7/23)

Hinode CG

On orbit since 22 September 2006 (Y+3266 )

The Hinode (Solar-B) is a highly sophisticated observational satellite equipped with three advanced solar telescopes. It was launched on 22 September 2006 UT (23 September in Japan time). Its solar optical telescope (SOT) has an unprecedented 0.2 arcsec resolution for the observation of solar magnetic fields. It would resolve a feature with the size of 50cm, if it observed the Earth. The X-ray telescope (XRT) has a resolution of three times as high as Yohkoh, and the EUV imaging spectrometer (EIS) has sensitivity ten times as high as the ESA SOHO instrument. These X-ray and EUV telescopes would reveal the heating mechanism and dynamics of the active solar corona.

With this suite of telescopes, we can address the following key questions in solar physics : Why does a hot corona exist above the cool atmosphere? What drives explosive events such as solar flares? What creates the Sun's magnetic fields?

The Hinode Science Center at NAOJ plays a lead role in instrument design and development, mission operation and data analysis with the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), and promotes international collaboration with the US and European partners.


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Hinode Science Center/NAOJ